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Wingman Wednesday

Lisa Marie DiGiacinto

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Photo By: Charlie Nesbitt

For actress Lisa Marie DiGiacinto, who stepped into DC’s Legends of Tomorrow during its 5th season as Ali, the love interest of Mick (Dominic Purcell), sometimes waiting for the perfect part means missing out on some of those that weren’t meant to be.

“I think the most important thing I’ve taken from this is that the right role will be there waiting for you, and only you… when the time is right,” she said in an exclusive interview with TrunkSpace. “All the other ones that you thought were the right one’ were just someone else’s ‘right one’!”

We recently sat down with DiGiacinto to discuss her Legends-ary welcoming, tapping into such a big fan base, and what it means for Vancouver to say goodbye to Supernatural.

TrunkSpace: What has been the most legendary part of your Legends of Tomorrow journey thus far?
DiGiacinto: I love the cast and crew! Everyone is so great at their jobs, always happy and welcoming on set and extremely well organized. I felt right at home every time I walked onto the set, even though I didn’t come in until the 5th season. I’m so grateful to work with such an amazing team. I couldn’t have dreamed up a better role or team or show! Also, I absolutely love that there’s time travel involved, it makes for so much more creativity for everyone involved, from acting in different eras and genres, to wardrobe, hair and makeup, the writers, directors, editors! Pretty hard to get bored when you get to do something new very episode.

TrunkSpace: When you’re stepping onto a set for the first time that already has established tone and way of doing things, how do you find your sea legs, especially when many of the people you’re acting alongside of have already built their rapport on camera and off?
DiGiacinto: I was extremely welcomed by everyone in the cast and crew; Dominic was such a pleasure to work with and I enjoyed improving with him – he’s hilarious. Tyron Carter, one of the series writers, welcomed me immediately and assured me that I was the only actress for the role, as well as the director, Alexandra LaRoche, who was so positive on set and excited about the chemistry between Dominic and I on screen. The whole cast in my scenes were all so easy to work with, very open, friendly and down to earth. It’s much easier to be authentic and do a great job when you have such a positive and supportive team.

Also… I spent the whole weekend before I was on set re-bingeing the first four seasons for prep.

TrunkSpace: How did you celebrate your debut on Legends of Tomorrow when it aired? Are you someone who can watch – and enjoy – your own work?
DiGiacinto: I had the chance to celebrate with family and friends with bottle of champagne. My friends and family are so supportive and happy for me. I’m very lucky. This is by far my favorite role, and I enjoyed celebrating with all my favorite people!

TrunkSpace: A show like Legends of Tomorrow has a vast catalog of characters who have journeyed in and out of the narrative over the course of its five seasons. What is it like being a part of that sort of character yearbook, especially when it’s on a series with such a loyal fan base behind it?
DiGiacinto: It’s pretty surreal, actually! It still hasn’t even really hit me yet. I guess it’s a bit nerve racking and exciting at the same time.

TrunkSpace: For fans, the final product of a film or series is always the most memorable part, but for those involved in a project, we’d imagine it goes much deeper than that. For you, what is something about your time working on Legends of Tomorrow thus far that you’ll carry with you through the course of your life/career?
DiGiacinto: I think the most important thing I’ve taken from this is that the right role will be there waiting for you, and only you… when the time is right. All the other ones that you thought were the right one” were just someone else’s “right one”! It makes this competitive industry a lot less daunting and the “rejection” doesn’t really feel like that to me anymore. It just reminds me that in life, everything happens for a reason.

TrunkSpace: You also appeared in an episode of Supernatural in Season 8. That show is now coming to an end. How important has that series been to the acting community of Vancouver over the course of its 15 seasons?
DiGiacinto: Wow. I’m pretty sure it’s the landmark of all shows filmed in Vancouver. It was actually the first larger principal role that I ever booked! I was so excited and very nervous to be on set with these huge stars. It was pretty intimidating, but I held my own. They were unbelievably nice! Also, I would say that about 80 percent of my colleagues have been on the show at least once. Many twice or more. Definitely helped us all pay the rent at some point. It also gave us such a wonderful opportunity to work on a show with such a huge fan base and production quality and value.

TrunkSpace: You’ve appeared in a number of series over the course of your career. Who is a character that you wished you had got to spend more time with and why?
DiGiacinto: This is such a tough question, I wanted more of all of them. When I only get one episode for my character, I always dream of ways to be written in again.

TrunkSpace: What do you love most about being on a set?
DiGiacinto: The magic that happens once the camera rolls, as well as the teamwork with the crew in between. Also, the camaraderie with the others while we’re waiting in the green room. Oh, and of course, there’s crafty… mmmm. I guess I like everything about being on set.

TrunkSpace: Where are you hardest on yourself as a performer and how do you overcome those self critical insecurities?
DiGiacinto: As a woman, it’s difficult not to compare yourself to all the gorgeous movie stars that you looked up to growing up. Also, I’m not a naturally skinny gal. I work out a ton and eat pretty healthy but I definitely have curves and build muscle easily. I actually wrote a short film called Bully, with the message that the biggest bully is the one in your head. I should shoot that, I actually forgot all about it as I started working on different projects.

TrunkSpace: Time machine question. If you could jump ahead 10 years and get a glimpse of what your career looks like a decade from now, would you take that journey? If not, why?
DiGiacinto: No way! As they say, “Life is about the journey, not the destination.” One of the best gifts this career has taught me. Also, to be present is such a gift, so how could I possibly live in the moment knowing exactly what happens in the future?!

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow airs Tuesday on The CW.

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Musical Mondaze

Glenn Thomas

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Photo By: Annelise Loughead

The pandemic that has served to lock most of us indoors is a global issue that we’re all facing, and while some of us are handling the new normal better than others, creatives like singer-songwriter Glenn Thomas have found themselves more musically-prolific than usual.

It’s funny, I’ve been more productive during this lockdown than I usually would be,” he said in an exclusive interview with TrunkSpace. “I guess that makes sense – you’re sort of forced to face your time without life’s usual distractions.”

For those of us who absorb the creative works of others, we’re in luck, because Thomas’ debut album, Reassure Me There’s A Window, drops this Friday.

We recently sat down with Thomas to discuss promoting an album during a worldwide health scare, breaking out from the comfort of a band, and dreaming beyond talent shows.

TrunkSpace: Your new album, Reassure Me There’s A Window, is set to drop on May 15. What kind of emotions do you juggle with when releasing new material into the world, and is the experience different this time around given that the entire world, essentially, is under some version of quarantine?
Thomas: I think regardless of the quarantine, releasing a new album is a mostly exciting but certainly terrifying venture. Here is a body of work you poured a lot of yourself into, from the personal revelation of songs and the time and money spent actually making the record. Add in the months of planning and you have a big sense of relief and accomplishment. The uncertainty comes in with regards to how people will react to it. Will they like it? Will it reach listeners or fall on deaf ears? I think as an artist you write songs for yourself, and you record songs for other people. The only difference now is people are home, and listening to more music.

TrunkSpace: Normally you would tour to support a new record release, but that is not something that is possible right now. How has – or will – promoting the album change? How do you get the word out when people can’t get out?
Thomas: I was really looking forward to the full band release show at The 5 Spot in Nashville, and the following tour, but of course those are canceled. The show goes on as they say, and I’ll be able to perform the album and talk to the virtual audiences with live streams. I enjoy doing live stream shows – they are intimate, and feel close, even though the audience isn’t visible, you have real-time comments and interaction. In terms of promoting, you aren’t going to geographically get in front of new audiences like a tour would, so the focus on selling tickets in a given region turns to, “How can I get more people to listen to this album around the country and internationally.”

TrunkSpace: As we understand it, the album sort of grew out of a batch of songs that you had written, but that didn’t necessarily fit the vibe of your band, Wild Sun. What was the process like for you, stepping out from the band and being able to take full creative destiny over the album? Was it exhilarating? Terrifying? A combination of the two?
Thomas: It was honestly exhilarating. I love playing with a band and likely always will need that outlet, but there’s something about giving more personal songs a completely different type of attention. This process was about giving each song the best possible sound for each song, rather than shaping songs around the band’s sound. Also, my biggest focus is usually writing lyrics. It’s a lot easier to get lyrics across clearly with acoustic-based music than it is where you are semi-shouting in front of an alt-rock power trio.

TrunkSpace: If someone sat down to listen to Reassure Me Theres A Window front to back, what would they learn about you both as an artist and as a person?
Thomas: The first thing they’d say is probably, “Gee, this guy is in his own head too much,” or “I need a tissue.” (Laughter) I think – and this is based on the reactions largely so far – people take away what was put into the songs, which is a careful approach to both the lyrics and the music. You hear a lot of influences throughout the songs, but you don’t hear a singular style or similarity across the board. The unifying element is the songwriting, which I think comes back to the lyrics.

TrunkSpace: We love a good lyric herethe kind that makes us curse that we didnt come up with it ourselves. Whats a favorite line or snippet from Reassure Me Theres A Window that youre particularly proud of and why?
Thomas: It’s hard to pick one line or song, because they are all so personally reflective, so here’s a few. In “All You Can Do,” I’m proud of the line, “Prayers will be said, but they work too slow when you have to fix the things that someone else broke.”

One song on the album that is entirely lyrically-driven is “There’s Not A Thing,” which imagines a phone conversation with an ex whom you haven’t spoken to in years. I really like the line: “Does that hydrangea bush still tower over you? Do you still still see that old ghost in the yard? When you called me up I did not know where to begin — I figured that was a good place to start.” To me if you are imagining that scenario and conversation, where do you even begin?

If I’m picking a sad lyric it would be, “I used to be a dreamer that no alarm could wake, now I’m facing facts that I don’t want to face,” in “When You Are Gone.”

TrunkSpace: What are you most proud of with the new album as a whole?
Thomas: I have always wanted to make an album with live strings on them, so I’m most proud to have been able to make that happen with a live string quartet and Jordan Lehning’s string arrangements. This is an album that I would have listened to and said, “I want to make an album that sounds like that.” That’s a great feeling.

TrunkSpace: We have all been in lockdown. How much of your time spent social distancing has also been spent creating? Have you experienced a creative jolt during this period and will it lead to another album?
Thomas: It’s funny, I’ve been more productive during this lockdown than I usually would be. I guess that makes sense – you’re sort of forced to face your time without life’s usual distractions. I’ve been writing a lot of instrumental songs without lyrics, partially because it is a fun mindset to be in and a different way of thinking, but I also don’t really want to complete songs that I wind up becoming more attached to than this album before this album is even released!

TrunkSpace: Where are you hardest on yourself as an artist and how do you overcome those self-critical insecurities?
Thomas: I think I’m pretty hard on myself in the sense of always trying to write a better song than the last one. It’s a good benchmark to have, but there are also songs I’ve written that I look at and wonder how I even came up with it at the time and there’s no point trying to best it. So I think I partially overcome it by looking at songs I love to listen to by other artists. Not all of them are life-changing, amazing songs… in fact, most of them are just plain fun to listen to. If you can complete a song and it’s fun to play and sing, and some people resonate with it – hey that’s great and an honest day’s work in my book.

TrunkSpace: If you sat down with your 10-year-old self and gave him a glimpse of his future, would he be surprised by where his musical journey has taken him thus far?
Thomas: When I was 10 I was playing the drums along to songs on my boombox, imagining myself in my school’s auditorium stage during a talent show or something. I thought if I could play on the same stage we have assemblies on, in front of my friends, I would hit my dreams. So if that same kid were to see where I am at now, the stages I’ve played, the experiences I’ve had and this path I have followed… well I’d hope that kid could take a shock well or at least be wearing a diaper.

TrunkSpace: Time machine question. If you could jump ahead 10 years and get a glimpse of what your career looks like a decade from now, would you take that journey? If not, why?
Thomas: No, definitely not. Life and pursuits are about the journey for me. There is no singular apex of achievement that eclipses the sum of all the little things that went into it. Say I sold out a huge venue and had the best show of my life. What happens the next day? If you’re doing this or living for those momentous, massive highlights, what’s the point of the day to day and the process of it all? If I could see the future it would reframe how I approach living.

Reassure Me There’s A Window is available May 15.

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Sit and Spin

Caleb Landry Jones’ The Mother Stone

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Artist: Caleb Landry Jones

Album: The Mother Stone

Reason We’re Cranking It: It has always driven us crazy when we hear people tell actors to “stay in their lane,” as if anybody is supposed to identify – or enjoy – being just one thing on their life journey. Thankfully, Jones – known for roles in films like Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri and Get Out – is swerving out of “his lane” and all over the creative road, giving us an album that is two parts Lennon – John and Sean – and is as fun of a ride as you could hope to have in extended quarantine.

What The Album Tells Us About Him: Jones, who has been writing and recording music since age 16, clearly has been influenced by the Beatles, but not only from a writing standpoint. The production quality on The Monster Stone is a mother of feat – a carnival of sweeping sounds, crisp in each crackle, that lifts you up and drops you down on a roller coaster ride that is both classic and unconventional, at least by today’s standards.

Track Stuck On Repeat: With 15 tracks to choose from, it’s easy to get lost in the selection shuffle, but it’s “You’re So Wonderfull” – an early arriver off of the record – that sets the tone and steals your harmonious heart.

And that means…

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Wingman Wednesday

Sherry Cola

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Photo By: Storm Santos

Although an urge to make people laugh has always been front and center for Sherry Cola, the comedian-turned-actress feels spoiled to have been able to venture into drama as one of the stars of the Freeform series Good Trouble. Not only has it been a career-changer for the multi-hyphenate, but being on set has helped to shape her future industry goals because she has been able to absorb the creative energy from the many talented actors and directors she has worked alongside of.

Before Good Trouble, I was squeezing rubber chickens and squirting water out of a flower,” she said in an exclusive interview with TrunkSpace.

We recently sat down with Cola to discuss her character journey, social media synergy, and why you have to put in the hours to get better at stand-up comedy.

TrunkSpace: Chicken or the egg question. You wear a lot of hats in the entertainment industry, from actress to writer to comedian, but what was the springboard for sending you down this path? Which platform cemented your love for a creative career?
Cola: I LOVE HATS. Life’s too short for just one hat, ya know? I’d say my comedian side was the loudest from day one. In high school, I hosted talent shows and created funny videos in film club. Making people laugh has always been my #1 passion. From doing radio to doing stand-up, and everything in between, my sense of humor is old faithful.

TrunkSpace: You’ve spent nearly 30 episodes playing Alice on Good Trouble in the life of the series thus far. What is it like spending that much time with one character? At what point in the process do you start to feel like you know her as well as yourself?
Cola: It’s been such a fun journey, portraying the adorable and apologetic Alice Kwan. I love discovering things about her, as if she’s a real person. In the beginning, I thought Sherry and Alice were practically synonymous – but the deeper I dug and the more I explored, I found new qualities in Alice that actually set us apart. It’s super cool being on a TV show and getting to spend so much time with a character. She’s a major part of me now. I can just turn Sherry off and turn Alice on. It comes so organically, to the point where I can actually improvise as Alice, in her sweet little nervous nature. It’s a treat.

TrunkSpace: In a day and age when viewers can not only react in real time, but interact in real time as well, what is it like being on a series that has such a big social media following? Is it odd to see how a particular storyline is perceived WHILE a show is airing for the first time?
Cola: Social media is a blessing and a curse, but I can’t get enough. I do enjoy tweeting with our dedicated viewers. It’s nice to be accessible and do an “ask me anything” online just to keep it spicy. A little goes a long way. It’s honestly exhilarating to see fans react to our show. Goosebumps, I tell ya!

TrunkSpace: Where has Good Trouble impacted your life the most? How has it altered your path?
Cola: I love that our show reflects on important social issues. We’re not afraid to speak up. Being on Good Trouble has opened my eyes more and more to Black Lives Matter, gentrification, trans rights, etc. On top of that, I’ve felt really empowered to represent my queer Asian community. It’s all about opening minds and starting conversations on how important it is to feel seen, and how a character like Alice has been invisible for years. I hope to continue making an impact in all of my work. These cheekbones won’t be ignored any longer!

TrunkSpace: For fans, the final product of a film or series is always the most memorable part, but for those involved in a project, we’d imagine it goes much deeper than that. For you, what is something about your time working on Good Trouble thus far that you’ll carry with you through the course of your life/career?
Cola: It’s dope that I got to dip my toe into drama. Before Good Trouble, I was squeezing rubber chickens and squirting water out of a flower. Another perk is constantly observing directors, studying our scripts and absorbing creative energy from my fellow castmates. Things like that stick with you and ultimately benefit your career. Being on this show has taught me many lessons and tricks, and I’m grateful for that. I’m spoiled.

TrunkSpace: As far as your stand-up career is concerned, was comedy always in the cards? Were you a “funny” kid, even at an early age?
Cola: I was voted “funniest” in marching band, “most spirited” in pep squad, and “most outgoing” in my senior yearbook. At a young age, you could count on me to say the darnest things. I’m not sure if I was born an extrovert, but I sort of found my voice in high school and I ran with it. I did “bits” in class and those class clown moments were such a thrill. I knew that this was my calling!

Photo By: Storm Santos

TrunkSpace: When did you decide to pursue stand-up comedy and did you make a plan for how you would attack things?
Cola: There’s no plan, exactly. Even now, I’m kinda going with the flow with a bunch of short-term goals. Stand-up isn’t overnight. With acting, you might book your first role ever and that immediately changes your life. With stand-up, you gotta put in those hours. There’s no faking it. I finally did stand-up officially (not counting the dabbles in high school) when a co-worker of mine at the radio station put on a comedy show. Everyone knew it was at least a bucket list sitch for me, so my boss convinced me to do it. The rest was history. That was March of 2016. Now I’m still doin’ the damn thing, grinding and getting better at my craft every day!

TrunkSpace: What is your most memorable stand-up performance experience (good or bad!) that will stick with you and why?
Cola: I recently opened for Ronny Chieng’s Netflix special taping and that was one for the books. It was a legit theater, so it was my biggest audience to date. All the Asians seriously showed up and came to support. I felt so proud to perform in front of my community and see their faces light up. People I’m inspired by, like Randall Park, were giving me compliments backstage. What a dream.

TrunkSpace: What has been the highlight of your career as a whole thus far?
Cola: There’s been lots of epic moments. I’ll say that working with Jon M. Chu is up there. He directed the pilot of Good Trouble and it was a huge deal for me. This was before Crazy Rich Asians even hit theaters, but it was so highly anticipated. My mom still brags to her friends and shows them photos I took with Jon. I can’t wait to hopefully work with him again!

TrunkSpace: Time machine question. If you could jump ahead 10 years and get a glimpse of what your career looks like a decade from now, would you take that journey? If not, why?
Cola: Tough one! I often say “ignorance is bliss” so let’s just stay in the present and find out what happens when I get there in 10 years. (Laughter)

Good Trouble airs on Freeform.

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Musical Mondaze

Mark Erelli

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For singer-songwriter Mark Erelli, creative anxiety is the perfect spice for the emotional stew that he serves up when releasing a new record into the world. Fans recently received a heaping dose of that delicious and soul-comforting stew in the form of his 12th album, Blindsided, a record that poses the types of internalized questions we all quietly ask ourselves as we journey through life.

I still feel like a kid, like the youngest person in the room, in so many ways,” he said in an exclusive interview with TrunkSpace. “One look in the mirror tells me that isn’t so, but maybe it can be a good thing to move through life feeling like you still have so much to learn, are full of questions, and hungry for new experiences.”

We recently sat down with Erelli to discuss pushing the envelope 20 years in, seeking but not necessarily finding answers, and the “Tao of Petty.”

TrunkSpace: Your new album, Blindsided, dropped on March 27. What kind of emotions do you juggle with as you gear up to release new music to the masses?
Erelli: The dominant emotion is still excitement, even after 20 plus years of releasing new music. Maybe even especially because it’s been so long, and yet I still feel like I’m pushing my own envelope and getting better at what I do. I’m just so grateful that I get to put something out there that might be able to be heard and appreciated long after I’m gone. If I’m being totally honest, I admit that anxiety also adds a little spice to my emotional stew around a record’s release. This is mainly because the way music is released and consumed keeps shifting, and it can be hard to keep up on the latest approach and best practices. The art is never cause for anxiety.

TrunkSpace: Are you someone who has a hard time letting go of what you create? Can it be difficult putting so much of yourself into something and then leaving it up to the universe to decide how it is perceived and accepted?
Erelli: I continually remind myself that all I can control is the art, and the reception is largely beyond my influence. The best way to deal with any difficulty I have in leaving an album’s reception up to the universe is to start daydreaming about what I want to do for my next project immediately after finishing one. I’ve already got several ideas I’m mulling over for album number 13.

TrunkSpace: The album is written from the perspective of someone who is halfway through their life and searching for answers in the sea of questions we all face at some point on our path. Did approaching some of these questions from a songwriting perspective allow you, as a person, to sort of work through them yourself in a way that perhaps you wouldn’t have been able to shed light on had you not gone on this creative journey?
Erelli: I definitely explored some things I need to work on in the course of writing this album. There are a lot of questions in these songs, a lot of wondering if I’m measuring up to what the people in my life need from me. And maybe I don’t always find an answer, but the questions are always coming from an honest place, of wanting to be the best I can be, and in that way I think the songs have been useful in hindsight. The songs become maps of previously unexplored territory. You don’t have any guide when you’re wandering through the emotional wilderness. But you can write a song after you get through a rough spot, looking back on how you got to where you are. Sometimes you think ‘I crushed that,’ and sometimes it’s more ‘let’s not go that way again.’

TrunkSpace: The title of the album struck us Blindsided. Have you felt blindsided by how quickly life has gone by in terms of, where you began and where you are today?
Erelli: I named the record after a song that kind of flips the often negative connotations associated with the term “blindsided,” making it about someone being happily surprised by love instead of taken unaware by something tragic. But I guess I also feel a little blindsided in the traditional meaning of the word. I still feel like a kid, like the youngest person in the room, in so many ways. One look in the mirror tells me that isn’t so, but maybe it can be a good thing to move through life feeling like you still have so much to learn, are full of questions, and hungry for new experiences.

TrunkSpace: If someone sat down to listen to Blindsided front to back, what would they learn about you both as an artist and as a person?
Erelli: That I don’t have all the answers but that I try really hard to ask the right questions. That the people that I love are the most important thing in my life. That I’m not perfect, more of a work in progress. That I want to leave the best world I possibly can to my kids. And, hopefully, that I’m better at what I do as an artist than I’ve ever been.

TrunkSpace: What are you most proud of with the new album?
Erelli: I’ve been a Tom Petty fan my entire life, and I am in awe by how simple and catchy his songs can be. I’ve always wanted to incorporate some of that feel into what I do, while still retaining my own voice. But it takes incredible control over your craft to make the ‘craft’ disappear. I’ve gone on jags where I’ve listened to nothing but Petty for several weeks in a row, but I never felt like the influence really took, like someone who didn’t know I was a fan could hear traces of it in my songs. Beginning with “Her Town Now,” I feel like I finally captured a bit of what I have come to refer to as the “Tao of Petty” in my songs. So I’m proud of that tribute to him and feel like it has made the songs better, more emotionally direct, and catchier than they’ve ever been before.

TrunkSpace: What do you get out of writing music that you cant achieve as a listener alone? Why is this music your particular outlet in life?
Erelli: When I went to college, there was a first year coffeehouse on campus before the year began in earnest. This young woman got up and sang Joni Mitchell’s “Gallery,” a song I’d not heard before despite being a Mitchell fan. It just floored me, and it really stilled the whole room. It was a moment where everyone was having some private reaction, but there was also a tangible communal aspect to it as well. I wanted to be responsible for creating that space for people, and I wanted people to trust me to lead them on a journey like that, even if it was only a few minutes long. I think you can do that by putting your own spin on a traditional folk song that’s been around for centuries. But for me it tended to happen most intensely with the singer/songwriters that I found as a young man—Jackson Browne, Joni Mitchell, John Gorka, Patty Griffin, etc – and it just felt natural to me that writing in that vein was how I would elicit the same reaction in others that I first had as a listener.

Photo By: Joe Navas

TrunkSpace: Where are you hardest on yourself as an artist and how do you overcome those self-critical insecurities?
Erelli: I sometimes have to remind myself that what can seem like an artistic shortcoming is usually caused by some factor extrinsic to the art. For example, sometimes I can’t help but think to myself ‘I should be able to headline this venue by now’ or ‘I should be selling this many records by this point in my career.’ Then I remember that I’m still married, which is not a foregone conclusion for a touring musician, and that I have a very satisfying career as a sideman that often takes me away from promoting my own records. I wouldn’t trade any of those things, which have brought me great joy and enriched my life as a person and musician. They might keep me from promoting my music to the fullest extent at times, but there is more to life than that. The challenge is to remind yourself that there is no path but your own, the one you make. You can’t look at any other artist by way of comparison, it doesn’t work and just fills you with doubt and self-loathing.

TrunkSpace: We recently attended a The Brother Brothers performance at the Charles River Museum. What an incredible space to take in live music. Can you tell us about your involvement in the 2nd Shift Music Series and what you hope to accomplish with the series as its curator?
Erelli: I didn’t know you were there, thanks for coming! I played that room as an artist in my own right, had a wonderful time, and really wanted it to thrive as a venue. I grew up going to church coffeehouses in the Boston suburbs, because I wasn’t old enough to get into bar shows. When the Charles River Museum folks asked if I’d like to curate the series for awhile, it felt like a way to give back and help present great music in an all-ages show in a cool and funky space at a reasonable price. Maybe there’s some kid like me out there that comes to one of these shows and it changes his life? Who knows, but that possibility excites me. And the fact that we’re not a coffeehouse, that you can get a beer or a glass of wine as you enjoy the show, really helps the vibe.

TrunkSpace: If you sat down with your 10-year-old self and gave him a glimpse of his future, would he be surprised by where his musical journey has taken him thus far?
Erelli: I think my younger self would be shocked, as I didn’t really exhibit any musical talent until I started doing musicals in 7th grade! But really, we should want to preserve this sense of wonder and awe at the notion that anything is possible for any kid. I’d hate to think that I peaked at ripe old age of 10 and that life had no more surprises in store.

TrunkSpace: Time machine question. If you could jump ahead 10 years and get a glimpse of what your career looks like a decade from now, would you take that journey? If not, why?
Erelli: No. Time moves fast enough as it is, and I have no wish for it to move any quicker than it already does. Truthfully, I’m happiest when I’m just doing the work—writing the songs, learning how to sing them better, figuring out how to bring someone else’s song to life as a sideman. That’s my daily practice and as long as I get a chance to do these things most every day, then I don’t really care where it ends up. A little more money would always be nice, but I am incredibly lucky to do what I do and there are many people who would gladly trade places. I just want a life in music, that’s all I want.

Blindsided is available now on Soundly Music.

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Wingman Wednesday

Lucie Guest

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Photo By: Studio Aviva

These are some weird, emotionally-draining times. For many of us, escaping into the fictional worlds of our favorite pop culture mainstays remains the only viable method of holding onto our sanity. One of our favorite binge-worthy broadcasts is Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, and just prior to lockdown, we spoke with series star Lucie Guest, who herself was a fan of the show before being cast as Circe.

I think I couldn’t help but feel more invested in the character having watched the show and knowing the world that these characters live in already,” she said in the exclusive interview with TrunkSpace.

We recently sat down with Guest to discuss the positive vibes on set, walking on spoiler eggshells, and her career behind the camera.

TrunkSpace: We read that you were a fan of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina before being cast as Circe. When you’re working on a project that you have a personal stake in as a viewer, does it alter the experience for you at all?
Guest: Yes. I think so. I think I couldn’t help but feel more invested in the character having watched the show and knowing the world that these characters live in already. My character comes from a different world but she interacts with their world in such a fun way. I was a fan of the show and also a fan of the team behind it. Roberto is someone I think has a specific and detailed vision and I wanted to bring that same level of detail to the character.

TrunkSpace: The series has a massive following and the fans take to the socials pretty quickly when a new season drops. What is it like being on a show that has so much buzz surrounding it? Is it a bit infectious and does it carry over onto the set?
Guest: It’s exciting. The set is such a fun environment despite it being a dark show. The cast are beyond sweet and so fun to be around. It’s the best coven out there.

TrunkSpace: On the opposite side of the coin, when you’re on a show with so much buzz, everyone must want to know what’s going to happen next. Are you in a constant state of fear, worrying about accidentally revealing spoilers, because frankly, it would be too much pressure for us to carry around in life?!
Guest: Ummm, Yes! I was so afraid to accidentally post anything that might spoil a new character or storyline or accidentally reveal someone dies… I almost posted a photo from the set and I zoomed in on the background and realized it would be a major plot spoiler!

TrunkSpace: For fans, the final product of a film or series is always the most memorable part, but for those involved in a project, we’d imagine it goes much deeper than that. For you, what is something about your time working on Chilling Adventures of Sabrina that you’ll carry with you through the course of your life/career?
Guest: I really loved the environment the cast created on the set of this show. I wish all shows were like this. I’ve talked about it before, but it’s so rare to be on a show where the cast is so welcoming and inviting. It makes such a big difference when you’re working on something and you look forward to going to work. It makes the long hours go by faster. I really think this has a lot to do with how amazing Kiernan is – she really sets the tone. All hail queen Kiki.

TrunkSpace: Can you tell us a little bit about Take Off to Love, which you co-wrote and will be directing?
Guest: It’s a feel good type of movie. It’s a romance about a girl who has to unexpectedly go back to her hometown to help her Aunt run her marina-side bed and breakfast and while she is there she starts to fall for the seaplane pilot who flew her over.

TrunkSpace: Does working behind the camera – writing and directing – fulfill a different part of your creative brain that acting can’t?
Guest: Yes. It is so nice to be a part of the creative process from the beginning to the end. I really feel like the years of acting experience has shaped my directing style.

TrunkSpace: Where are you hardest on yourself as a creative and how do you overcome those self-critical insecurities?
Guest: I think it’s part of the creative process to have a critical eye, but what helps is having a deadline. Sometimes, I need to just walk away from something because I could rewrite it or tweak the edit or do another take. For me, it’s hard to fully feel like the creative process is ever really “finished” so that’s when it’s good to have a deadline.

TrunkSpace: What has been the highlight of your career as a whole thus far?
Guest: I am most proud of a movie that I wrote and directed and acted in called Never Better – A Closure Comedy.

Photo By: Studio Aviva

TrunkSpace: Time machine question. If you could jump ahead 10 years and get a glimpse of what your career looks like a decade from now, would you take that journey? If not, why?
Guest: Yes! The best is yet to come. Wink.

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina is available on Netflix for your binge-watching pleasure!

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Musical Mondaze

Kevin Krauter

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With his second solo album, Full Hand, out today on Bayonet, Kevin Krauter is not the type of artist who consciously calculates where his creative endeavors take him.

I don’t really try to plan out big themes or sounds before I make an album, I just try my best to write and record music that makes me happy and I think what makes this release different is that I’m better at it now,” he said in an exclusive interview with TrunkSpace.

We recently sat down with Krauter to discuss why he isn’t a “cool musician,” the four-letter word he’s as chill as, and the reason you may want to reconsider emailing him.

TrunkSpace: Your new album, Full Hand, drops February 28. What kind of emotions do you juggle with as you gear up to release new music to the masses?
Krauter: I don’t know, it’s hard to say ‘cause nothing really sticks out among the myriad of emotions that accumulate anytime you work on a huge project. But mostly at this point I’m just excited for people to finally hear all of it ‘cause there’s definitely a lot of it that I’m stoked on outside of the singles.

TrunkSpace: Are you someone who has a hard time letting go of what you create? Can it be difficult putting so much of yourself into something and then leaving it up to the universe to decide how it is perceived and accepted?
Krauter: Not really. I mean, I’ve heard it so much at this point that I feel a bit numb to it. But I pay very close attention to what people say about every release. I know it sounds weird – and cool musicians are supposed to say they don’t care and don’t pay attention – but I’m way too curious about what people say about me. (Laughter) I don’t really get too offended when people shit on my music honestly, but I simply have to know – like, I really can’t help it.

TrunkSpace: Full Hand is your second solo album. No one is closer to the music than you, so we wonder what you view as the biggest differences – both thematically and sonically – when lined up against your 2018 debut, Toss Up?
Krauter: That’s kind of hard to answer ‘cause I just see it all as a progression of what I’ve done before. I don’t really try to plan out big themes or sounds before I make an album, I just try my best to write and record music that makes me happy and I think what makes this release different is that I’m better at it now.

TrunkSpace: If someone sat down to listen to Full Hand front to back, what would they learn about you both as an artist and as a person?
Krauter: They would learn that I’m chill as fuck.

TrunkSpace: What are you most proud of with the new album?
Krauter: The lyrics.

TrunkSpace: What do you get out of creating music that you can’t achieve as a listener alone? Is it therapeutic to feed your emotions through songs?
Krauter: Yeah, for sure. I mean, if that element of catharsis wasn’t present I wouldn’t be doing it at all. It’s hard to say what I get out of it really – it’s more that I need to make it. Like someone who draws or paints is compelled to do both. I’m lucky I’ve had the privilege in my life to have those impulses encouraged and supported. Many people do not.

TrunkSpace: Would you rather create one album that sells millions of copies worldwide, or a lifetime of music that a small audience connects with?
Krauter: I don’t know. I haven’t had either happen to me yet so it’s hard to say.

TrunkSpace: In terms of the business side of music, what is the most difficult aspect of being an artist in 2020?
Krauter: Responding to emails.

Photo By: Rachel Cabitt

TrunkSpace: If you sat down with your 10-year-old self and gave him a glimpse of his future, would he be surprised by where his musical journey has taken him thus far?
Krauter: Yeah. Honestly, I think he’d be stoked as fuck. (Laughter) I wanted to be in a band for as long as I can remember and now I’m doing it. I would say maybe I’d be bummed about how broke I am, but I probably wouldn’t care.

TrunkSpace: Time machine question. If you could jump ahead 10 years and get a glimpse of what your career looks like a decade from now, would you take that journey? If not, why?
Krauter: No way, man. I think seeing my future would either make me really depressed or just straight up go insane. Time travel is very freaky to me.

Full Hand is available now on Bayonet.

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Opening Act

Acid Tongue

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Photo By: Stephanie-Severance

Artist: Acid Tongue

Latest Release: Bullies (Freakout Records)

Hometown: Seattle, WA

Members: Guy Keltner/Ian Cunningham

TrunkSpace: The band is set to drop its latest album, Bullies, on March 13. What emotions do you juggle with as you prepare to release new music to the masses, particularly with something like this album, which is said to be the start of a new “polished” direction for the band?
Keltner: There’s a lot of relief associated with releasing this album. We started recording it before we had even finished our debut LP, Babies. It took about 18 months to finally pin down the last of the sessions, since they were all broken up between tours. We cut different pieces of it in Seattle, Portland and Los Angeles. Then we sat on it for a while so we could figure out the best way to release it. It’s a step up from anything we’ve done before, sonically, so we didn’t want to rush this one out like we have done with past releases.

TrunkSpace: You guys have been at it – writing, recording and touring – together since 2015. We mentioned the new direction for the band, but for you guys, what has the creative journey been like? What did your creative POV look like back in 2015 when it all began to where you are today on the eve of releasing Bullies? Do you see the music you’re creating differently now than you did then?
Keltner: We’re in a completely different headspace these days. Back in 2015 I was leaving my job working for a pretty large night club & festival in Seattle. My life here was in a tailspin so a lot of those early songs are really dark, the sessions were chaotic, and our live shows were all over the map. Since then, I spent a few years in Brooklyn, lived in Paris for a year, and did a ton of touring all over the world with Ian (Cunningham) and various other band members we picked up along the way. We’ve polished our writing process, we work better in the studio together, and we learned how to function like a well-oiled machine on the road. We’ve done a lot of growing up the past five years.

TrunkSpace: No one knows your music better than you. With that said, where do you hear the biggest differences between your first EP and what makes up Bullies today?
Keltner: The message in my lyrics has changed substantially over time. Back when we started out, especially on our first two EPs, a lot of the content was inspired by my dreams, weird lucid nightmares I’d have, and some very autobiographical moments from my personal life. Since then we’ve tackled adolescence (on Babies) and the arc of a short-lived romance (The Night We Broke Our Lease). This new record, Bullies, is all about that period in your late 20s and early 30s where you figure out who you are, what you want, what you’re willing to put up with in life, and maybe try and figure out what it all means and where things are going.

TrunkSpace: If someone sat down and listened to Bullies front to back, what would they learn about you guys upon that first dive into the music?
Keltner: We know how to write a decent riff. And hopefully they find the lyrics interesting.

TrunkSpace: Outside of the music itself, what did you want to accomplish with the production on Bullies that perhaps you were unable to achieve on earlier releases? Did you achieve your vision for the album as a whole when you called wrap on the process?
Keltner: I’m honestly really bored with a lot of contemporary rock records, so our main goal was to do something unique and interesting. We’ve totally been the type of band to go lo-fi, bedroom, fuzzy pop record. But we’re kind of growing out of that and wanted to take a stab at really banging out a neat little opus. Adding some serious synth lines and string arrangements was the cherry on top – these are things we don’t have a ton of experience with but we knew we wanted to explore during production. I think Bullies went way beyond what we originally envisioned, in the best possible way. Things grew and matured through a really natural and organic process.

TrunkSpace: What are you most proud of with the album?
Keltner: The title track started out so completely different from what you end up hearing. We had no clue where that song was headed, and one day it just clicked and became what it is now. We’re really proud of that one.

TrunkSpace: What do you get being in a band that you can’t achieve in a solo capacity? Does having another brain in the mix fuel your own creativity?
Keltner: Well, for one thing I think having Ian in the mix sets me up to focus on songwriting and my performance. I still stay deeply involved in our business, especially as it relates to my label, Freakout Records. However, Ian is really focused on our image, the graphics, the photos, the general branding of the band, and he’s a huge asset when we step into the production side of recording and start polishing up our songs. We have a nice relationship dividing up all the things a band needs to do to stay relevant, working and busy.

TrunkSpace: Are you more at home in the studio or on the stage, and if one feels more comfortable to you, why do you think that is?
Keltner: I go back and forth on this. I am always very comfortable on stage and in the studio, however there are drawbacks with both. I personally hate long drives and crappy food on the road. I used to love all the craziness, but after 30 you start to hate sleeping on couches and watching people party all night when you’re completely drained and exhausted. The studio can be a relaxing environment, but it can also be tedious and start to feel claustrophobic.

TrunkSpace: What has been the highlight of your career thus far?
Keltner: We toured with the King Khan & BBQ Show last month. It was short, just three dates, but it was a ton of fun. My wife was their go-go dancer during their sets, and flew a friend up from LA to dance as well. They dressed up as sexy skunks and sprayed the crowd with water between their legs. Ian and I brought our buddy Ryan from Smokey Brights (a great act on Freakout), and had a killer time essentially partying every night with our friends. Literally nothing super special about this run of dates other than the fact that we’re really tight on stage right now, King Khan rules live, and I love traveling with my family and friends.

TrunkSpace: Time machine question. If you could jump ahead 10 years and get a glimpse of what your career looks like a decade from now, would you take that journey? If not, why?
Keltner: Hell no. I love the surprises.

Bullies is due March 13 on Freakout Records. Their latest single, “Follow The Witch,” is available now.

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Wingman Wednesday

Tyler Cotton

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Photo By: Noah Asanias

For Tyler Cotton, there has been nothing chilling about his adventure in acting since joining the cast of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina. Although he had originally auditioned for the part of Harvey, it was Melvin who he was hired to inhabit on screen – and for much longer than he ever anticipated at the time.

Melvin was only meant to be in one episode originally, so every day that I’m back on set I am so blessed and grateful,” he said in an exclusive interview with TrunkSpace.

We recently sat down with Cotton to discuss the impact of the series on his personal life, forever friendships, and how he’d like to see the Boy Wonder factor into his career.

TrunkSpace: Chilling Adventures of Sabrina has a huge following and a rabid fan base. Where has your life been impacted the most since joining the series as Melvin?
Cotton: One of the biggest impacts has been my day to day. Because of this amazing show I got to quit my day job and put all my energy and focus into this role/show and into my acting career.

TrunkSpace: Although grounded in reality, the Chilling Adventures of Sabrina is the kind of series where anything can happen. What was the craziest on-set moment that you experienced where you looked around and said to yourself, “Is this my life right now?”
Cotton: Every day is like that for me! Melvin was only meant to be in one episode originally, so every day that I’m back on set I am so blessed and grateful. I genuinely think that every day I’m on set I have a moment where I look around and think about how lucky I am to be where I am.

TrunkSpace: You’ve spent more than 10 episodes playing Melvin. At what point in the process do you start to feel like you know him as well as yourself?
Cotton: Every time I think I know Melvin I get a script that really makes me think about the character more and more. I feel like I know Melvin really well but then I get an opportunity to explore deeper into the character and that’s something that always excites me!

TrunkSpace: From what we understand, you originally auditioned for Harvey. In an alternate reality where you’re playing that character – do you think your journey since joining the series would have been dramatically different had you played a different character?
Cotton: Oh my god, my journey would have been extremely different but I’m also really happy with how things turned out! Ross (Lynch) is the perfect Harvey and does an amazing job and I really love Melvin.

TrunkSpace: For fans, the final product of a film or series is always the most memorable part, but for those involved in a project, we’d imagine it goes much deeper than that. For you, what is something about your time working on Chilling Adventures of Sabrina thus far that you’ll carry with you through the course of your life/career?
Cotton: I mean I genuinely hope that the friendships I’ve made continue on. I’m so blessed to be on a show with such an amazing cast and crew and I feel like I’ve built some really strong connections with a bunch of people and those are relationships I’d like to keep!

TrunkSpace: What is the biggest lesson you’ve ever learned on set – any set – that you still apply to your work with every job you book?
Cotton: Respect. It sounds silly but respect is the biggest thing you can apply to your work on set. Respect the crew because they are there before you get there and long after. Respect your fellow actors, respect the work they have put in and respect their process on set.

TrunkSpace: Who has had the biggest impact on your career – whether through physical assistance or as a support system? Is there someone you feel has had a lasting impact on your path thus far?
Cotton: The answer to this will always be my parents. I’m so lucky to have the parents that I have – they have supported me through this extremely difficult career and continue to push me and help me grow as an actor and as a person.

TrunkSpace: Blank check question. If someone came to you tomorrow and said, “Tyler, here is an unlimited amount of money, I want you to go and make whatever project you want for yourself,” what kind would you put into develop and greenlight?
Cotton: Good question! My dream role is to play Robin (like Batman and Robin). Robin had his own comic book series that ran for 183 issues. I’d love to do a Robin series following those comics.

TrunkSpace: What has been the highlight of your career as a whole thus far?
Cotton: Without a doubt this show has been the highlight of my career so far. Not only because it is an incredible show to be a part of but also because of the amazing cast and crew who put so much love into the show.

TrunkSpace: Time machine question. If you could jump ahead 10 years and get a glimpse of what your career looks like a decade from now, would you take that journey? If not, why?
Cotton: I don’t think I would take that journey because then no matter the outcome I’ll always be thinking about that future instead of focusing on myself and my career right now. It would be tempting though!

Season 3 of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina is available now on Netflix.

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Wingman Wednesday

Adam Faison

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Photo By: Brett Erickson

While the Freeform series Everything’s Gonna Be Okay is impacting viewers on a weekly basis, it has also left its mark on star Adam Faison, who, because of his time playing Alex, has been able to put a lot of his own life in perspective.

I think this show opened my eyes a lot to accepting the place that you are at in life and loving who you are in this moment,” he said in an exclusive interview with TrunkSpace.

We recently sat down with Faison to discuss his connection to the series, ghost hunting with costar Kayla Cromer, and why poetry helps him find calm in the chaos.

TrunkSpace: You had a lot of heavy emotional experiences going on in your life when you started your journey with Everything’s Gonna Be Okay, some of which paralleled the narrative of the show. In a way, did the work – being on set – serve as a welcome distraction, and through that, do you feel like you have an even more personal connection to the series/work?
Faison: Yes, so I’ve been pretty open with sharing that before filming, my mom was diagnosed with cancer much like Nicholas’ dad is in the show. So, there was that personal connection. But I also felt a huge connection with the autism storylines in the series. Pretty much all throughout my mom’s adult life, she has been working with kids with special needs, so as a result I was exposed to kids with different abilities from a young age. Her department was called the “Inclusion Department” because it created an equal environment where kids with special needs were included in camp activities with neurnerotypical kids. It was an environment that was really combating ableism. And growing up seeing that, really had an impact on me and was something that made this project particularly so resonant for me. If we get another season, I’m going to try to get one of my childhood friends from camp, Matthew, onto the show as a background actor because all of characters on the show with autism are authentically cast, which is really special.

TrunkSpace: With those parallels present, do you feel like it helped you connect and understand Alex in a way that would have taken you more time with another character or another storyline?
Faison: I think that having a lot of friends on the spectrum growing up led to me having a really instant connection with Kayla (Cromer). We would FaceTime every Sunday and rehearse lines together and we would connect on our love of true crime (Mindhunter in particular), SVU, the paranormal and our crushes (Matthew Gray Gubler will always be her number one).

I remember there was one time we were hanging on set and I told her I might have spotted “an entity” in the rafters of our sound stage and she planned to bust out the ghost hunting equipment the next day. (Laughter) We just had some really fun times together and a really strong bond – I mean like, we call each other brother and sister – and I can’t help but think that made for an ever richer relationship on screen.

TrunkSpace: As a whole, where has Everything’s Gonna Be Okay impacted your life the most? How has it altered your path?
Faison: I think this show opened my eyes a lot to accepting the place that you are at in life and loving who you are in this moment. I think Alex is such a free and unabashedly happy person and me, as Adam, can struggle with that at times just because I have grown up so much of my life being told by people that who I am was too much. So, in a way, Alex feels a bit like the free, uninhibited version of myself when I was younger. Before all of that codeswitching.

TrunkSpace: The best art is always the kind that is saying something – doing more that just entertaining. The kind that leaves the audience, perhaps, thinking about something in a different way than when they began their journey. Do you feel like Everything’s Gonna Be Okay is that show, and what do you hope fans get out of it other than a momentary escape?
Faison: I think it’s really combating stereotypes in that it’s just depicting humans who are living their lives like everyone else. And I think anyone can relate to that. For example, take my dad: he’s a reserved military guy in his 60s and doesn’t exactly fit the demographic of this show. So, when he came to an early screening of the show, I’ll admit I was little nervous to hear what he might think. But after the screening ended, he actually stood up during the Q&A and he said, “At first, I didn’t really know why I enjoyed this show, but I think it’s about human connection. It’s got a lot of heart.” And I hope that’s what a lot of others see as well. This idea that although we may be different in our presenting identities, in the end, we are all just humans with the same basic needs.

TrunkSpace: For fans, the final product of a film or series is always the most memorable part, but for those involved in a project, we’d imagine it goes much deeper than that. For you, what is something about your time working on Everything’s Gonna Be Okay thus far that you’ll carry with you through the course of your life/career?
Faison: I guess, that sometimes life throws you curve balls but nothing is insurmountable. This message rings true in many facets of the show, but in particular I felt this in the relationship between Alex and Nicholas (played by Josh Thomas). Like, going into the season (and kind of throughout, actually), Nicholas has some real baggage he is dealing with, and many potential suitors might have shied away from him. And yet, the character of Alex really meets Nicholas halfway with where he’s at in his life. I think this was particularly inspiring to me personally, in this age of these never-ending dating apps, where it feels like there is no accountability in relationships because everybody is making these fleeting, transactional connections. So conversely, it felt very refreshing to see this couple make a deeply meaningful connection, and it encouraged me to look for something like that in my own life.

TrunkSpace: You write poetry. Is that creative outlet a way for you to work through and understand thoughts and emotions that, perhaps, you wouldn’t be able to gain personal insight on if you didn’t take pen in hand?
Faison: Definitely. What’s amazing about poetry is that I feel I can express what I want to say with no end result. It’s just for me (and for any others whom may connect with it). When I write, it feels like a real catharsis to work through all the levels of emotion that I’m feeling.

For example, sometimes at night, I’m flooded with all of these thoughts gnawing at my brain and it really helps that I can concretize them and expound them into this new form, because it makes them not feel so overwhelming. Poetry helps me find calm in the chaos.

Photo By: Brett Erickson

TrunkSpace: Where are you hardest on yourself as an actor and how do you overcome those self-critical insecurities?
Faison: So I’m getting better at dealing with this, but I tend to be a perfectionist when it comes to getting the lines right. In the past, I’ve been a pretty horrible memorizer, and if I know some words are off, I feel like I tend to hyper focus on them. However, I’ve gotten better about first seeing the bigger picture of what’s happening in the scene/ monologue so that it doesn’t feel so daunting.

TrunkSpace: If you could sit down and have a conversation with your 16-year-old self, would he be surprised by the trajectory of your career, and if so, why?
Faison: I think so. My 16-year-old self was just trying to survive and figure out who he was going to sit next to at school the next day so no one would think that he was a loner. He stopped acting for a while because people were giving him so much crap for it. He wanted to go into language studies, go into the CIA, and head abroad where no one would know him. So, I think the fact that he would’ve returned to acting and made it this far – while also being true to himself – would really surprise him.

TrunkSpace: What has been the highlight of your career as a whole thus far?
Faison: Honestly, doing this press tour for the series. I remember interning for a few years at NBCUniversal and I would make talent itineraries: booking cars, hotels, etc, and I can’t believe that I’m technically the talent now. There was a point during TCAs when we were rounding the home stretch of interviews and we were at this Hulu video promo shoot, and I looked over at Kayla and started tearing up just thinking about how far I’d come in this journey. I know it sounds super sentimental/cheesy but in that moment, it really felt like I was the squeaky wheel that got the grease.

TrunkSpace: Time machine question. If you could jump ahead 10 years and get a glimpse of what your career looks like a decade from now, would you take that journey? If not, why?
Faison: I try to be as present as I can and take in what’s happening around me but I definitely do like to look ahead and see what I would like to accomplish. I think it’s important for me to do so from time to time because these career decisions that I make today will ultimately affect the decisions I get to make in the future.

In the next 10 years, I would love to help other marginalized voices find a platform through producing, acting and political change, so most of the projects that I choose tend to be through a lens that will align with that.

Everything’s Gonna Be Okay airs Thursdays on Freeform.

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